Articles Tagged with the fair labor standards act

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The Fair Labor Standards Act requires that both private and federal employers in the United States pay hourly (non-exempt) workers overtime at a minimum of 1.5x’s the normal hourly rate for any hours past forty hours in a workweek.

Now that you know what consists of a workweek and how you accrue overtime, you may be ready to pick up some extra hours to pay for some extras during the holiday season. Hold that thought. There are types of workers who are exempted from the overtime requirement. Those workers are generally salaried and make at least $684 a week (as of September 24, 2019). Those people are:

  • Administrative Employees:
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Photo by Erwan Hesry on Unsplash

With the holidays around the corner, many hourly workers are thinking about picking up extra shifts to supplement their normal income to pay for the festivities of the holiday season. Before you do that, especially if you’re a part-time worker, here’s how those hours in a workweek work.

The Fair Labor Standards Act requires that both private and federal employers in the United States pay hourly workers overtime at a minimum of 1.5x’s the normal hourly rate for any hours worked past forty in a workweek. While that workweek does have to have seven days, it does not have to match up to the standard Calendar week. For purposes of knowing if you, as an hourly worker, are supposed to receive overtime, it is important to know from what days your job’s workweek runs.

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The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) regulates the labor practices of both private and federal employers in the United States. It was enacted to ensure that U.S. employers kept a fair and safe work environment for employees.

Included in this act are the bare minimum requirements for how employers must pay their employees. Those requirements include overtime pay for employees who have worked more than forty hours in a workweek.

The FLSA requires that hourly workers be paid overtime of, at minimum, 1.5x’s the normal hourly rate of their job. That means that even if you’re a minimum-wage worker ($7.25 per hour at the time of this writing), you’re entitled to at least 1.5x’s that rate ($10.875) for every hour that you work over forty hours.